Seabird life history and climate variation on the Great Barrier Reef, 2001 - 2010 (MTSRF 2.5i.2, JCU)

To date the seabird research program has: 1. Quantified how increases in El-Nino intensity and sea-surface temperatures (SST) result in decreased breeding participation, increased foraging effort, reduced food availability, poor chick growth and/or reproductive failure across multiple seabird species in both the northern and southern GBR. 2. Identified important seabird foraging areas/regions that the lie both within and outside the GBR region 3. Identified physiochemical and oceanographic correlates associated with both the important foraging areas and El-Nino/SST impacts 4. Examined the relative impacts of other anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic stressors such as cyclone frequency and tourist visitation rates at a key breeding site 5. Examined the ability of multiple pelagic foraging seabird species to copy with climate related changes in food availability via behavioural and/or developmental plasticity. References: - Devney et al. 2009 Sensitivity of tropical seabirds to El NiƱo precursors Ecology 90:1175-1183 - Congdon et al. 2007 Vulnerability of seabirds on the Great Barrier Reef to climate change In: Johnson J. & Marshall P. (eds) Climate change and the Great Barrier Reef. GBRMPA, Canberra - Erwin & Congdon 2007 Day-to-day variation in sea-surface temperature reduces sooty tern foraging success on the GBR. MEPS 331:255-266 - Congdon et al. 2005 Dual-foraging and co-ordinated provisioning in a tropical Procellariiform MEPS 301:293-301 - Peck et al. 2004 Sea-surface temperature constrains wedge-tailed shearwater foraging success within breeding seasons MEPS 281:259-266 - Smithers et al. 2003 Elevated sea-surface temperature reduced provisioning and reproductive failure of wedge-tailed shearwaters in the Southern GBR. Marine & Freshwater Research 55:973-977

Principal Investigator
Congdon, Brad, Dr Centre for Tropical Environmental & Sustainability Sciences, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University (JCU)
Point Of Contact
Congdon, Brad, Dr Centre for Tropical Environmental & Sustainability Sciences, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University (JCU) brad.congdon@jcu.edu.au

Data Usage Constraints
  • Access to data set negotiated with custodian
  • The eAtlas does not retain a copy of this dataset.