Biologically Important Areas (BIAs)

Species Richness

Species richness is a count of the number of different species that exist in a given region or ecological community. It is one of the simplest ways to describe community and regional diversity and is commonly used for a range of environmental assessments in conservation and management. 

Use the interactive map below to discover which areas around Australia have high and low species richness.

Ramsar Wetlands of International Importance

Wetlands are a critical part of our natural environment. They protect our shores from wave action, reduce the impacts of floods, absorb pollutants and improve water quality. They provide habitat for animals and plants and many contain a wide diversity of life, supporting plants and animals that are found nowhere else. The Convention on Wetlands of International Importance (the Ramsar Convention) was signed in Ramsar, Iran on 2 February 1971. The Ramsar Convention aims to halt the worldwide loss of wetlands and to conserve, through wise use and management, those that remain.

World Heritage Areas

World Heritage Areas are places that are considered to be of outstanding value to humanity. Their aim is to protect natural and cultural heritage, and listed sites are places that belong to all the people of the world irrespective of their location. Sites that are nominated for World Heritage listing are only inscribed on the list after they have been carefully assessed as representing the best examples of the world's cultural and natural heritage.

IMCRA Provincial Bioregions

The Integrated Marine and Coastal Regionalisation of Australia (IMCRA v4.0) classified Australia's marine environment into ecologically relevant bioregions for regional planning. These bioregions are the basis for the development of a National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas (NRSMPA).

IMCRA Mesoscale Bioregions

The Integrated Marine and Coastal Regionalisation of Australia (IMCRA v4.0) classified Australia's marine environment into ecologically relevant bioregions for regional planning. These bioregions are the basis for the development of a National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas (NRSMPA).

Key Ecological Features

The Key Ecological Features (KEFs) are parts of the marine ecosystem that are considered to be of particular importance for either a region's biodiversity or its ecosystem function and integrity. This could relate to a species integral to a community (e.g. a predator that impacts a large biomass or number of species), an important habitat type (e.g. that supports high productivity or aggregations of nesting or breeding animals), or a unique seafloor feature that positively impacts the surrounding ecosystem (e.g.

Bathomes of Australian waters

Bathomes are large spatial regions (usually exceeding 1000 km2) characterised by the bathymetric (depth-related) distribution of biota. Bathymetry is important in determining the types of biological communities that exist in a given region. To a large extent, depth determines the amount of light that reaches the seafloor, and it also has a strong influence on the temperature. Different species have specific conditions of light and temperature that they need to survive, and this limits their distribution within the ocean.

eReefs CSIRO Hydrodynamic model (Temperature, Salinity, Wind, Current) Summaries (AIMS)

PreviewThis data set contains summaries (daily, monthly, seasonal, annual) of the eReefs CSIRO hydrodynamic model outputs (GBR 4km v2.0 and GBR 1km v 2.0), covering water temperature, salinity and current at 6 depths (GBR1: 1.5m, 18m, 49m, 103m, 200m and 315m, GBR4: 2.35m, 18m, 49m, 103m,

Tea time for Turtles - what do they actually eat?

Where: Lynher Bank, Kimberely Marine Park - approximately 120 nautical miles north of Broome

Who: AIMS, Department of Parks and Wildlife (WA), WAMSI (AIMS, CSIRO), WA Museum... ADD OTHERS!!

When: 2016

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