Environmental research, maps and data for tropical Australia

Recent articles

  • Published on
    11 June 2020
    Global populations of green (IUCN listing endangered) and hawksbill (IUCN listing critically endangered) turtles are declining due to a range of threats. Australia supports some of the largest rookeries (nesting sites) for these turtles in the Indo-Pacific. Even though they've been much studied, most data that shows where these turtles spend their time around Australia remains unpublished. This is a problem because there are many coastal and offshore activities such as mining, commercial fishing and pollution that may threaten these species. In order to protect them, we need to know the areas that are important to them; the areas where they spend time during the nesting season, their migratory routes and the areas where they forage (feed). In the absence of hard data, the Australian Government have previously designated Habitat Critical Areas as part of the Recovery Plan for Marine Turtles and Biologically Important Areas based on expert scientific knowledge. Here, we set out to quantify and map the important areas that turtles use to help refine these protected areas and assist with turtle conservation management.
  • Published on
    9 June 2020
    The Silver Lipped Oyster, Pinctada maxima, forms the basis of a historical fishery in tropical Western Australia, estimated to be worth $A61 million in 2013. This fishery supplies pearl and mother of pearl markets through wild harvest of P. maxima stock, augmented more recently with aquaculture. Eighty Mile Beach is a key harvesting area, where P. maxima is reported to occur at depths from 8-40 metres. P. maxima is often found where the seabed is solid and hard and can support communities of filter feeders like sponges. Some reports, however, suggest that P. maxima can survive at depths of up to 120 metres (see p 39 in this report). Studies have shown that populations of P. maxima within the region are highly connected to one another. This raises the question of whether oysters located deeper than those safely visited by divers (beyond 30-40 metres) may help replenish stocks in shallower areas. At present, the extent to which P. maxima occurs at these depths (>40 metres) within the region near Eighty Mile Beach is poorly known.
  • Published on
    5 February 2020
  • Published on
    16 December 2019
    Bardi-Jawi Marine Rangers partner with marine scientists to research fish and coral recruitment processes in the Kimberley.
  • Published on
    20 May 2019
    Data is now available for download from the AIMS Long Term Monitoring Program and the Marine Monitoring Programs.

Recent datasets

Modified on
14 April 2021
PreviewThis dataset collected variation in the demography of Pacific crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris) during the latest period of elevated starfish densities (active population irruptions) in the central section of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.
Modified on
12 April 2021
PreviewThis dataset consists of a small CSV file containing the locations, names and country of the Torres Strait villages associated with the Australian and Papua New Guinea Treaty Protected Zone and neighbouring PNG Treaty villages This dataset is intended for the creation
Modified on
12 April 2021
PreviewThe dataset consist consists on 2 (A-B) csv files and one excel file (E).
Modified on
8 April 2021
PreviewThis dataset explores a new approach to predict coral bleaching events. It uses a temperature anomaly map to create a spatially dynamic temperature threshold for the calculation of degree heating weeks (DHW) instead of using a static constant.