Articles

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Pisonia; or Birdlime Tree (due to the fact that at times nesting birds become covered with the sticky fruits).

On coral cays, pisonia forests are tolerant of temporary saltwater and freshwater inundations and can tolerate full water lenses and waterlogged conditions better than other woody competitors. Pisonia are, however, prone to shed branches during storms; the fallen trees and/or branches sprout and revegetate the damaged forest areas. Pisonia wood is rather weak and soft and decays rapidly after the trees fall.

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Barramundi is an iconic species throughout northern Australia and are important for all fishing sectors economically, socially and culturally. Catches of barramundi vary spatially and temporally and can be significantly related to river flow or rainfall and evaporation. Variability in catch probably represents changes in underlying stock abundance linked to environmental drivers.
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The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) was listed as a World Heritage Area because of its Outstanding Universal Values. This website highlights the connectivity of these world heritage values between the Great Barrier Reef with the surrounding regions: the Coral Sea, Torres Strait and Hervey bay. Understanding this connectivity highlights the importance of co-management between these neighbouring regions where connectivity is strong.

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Interactive map displays stereo-video imagery collected for the Barossa Environmental Baseline Study 2015, Western Australia. Click on the map below (i.e. the blue dots) to view short videos of the fish and benthos collected at each site. Two cameras were used to obtain accurate length measurements of the fish.

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Environment Australia is tasked with managing the networks of Commonwealth Marine Reserves (CMRs). This is particularly challenging for the CMRs in the remote and poorly known N and NW regions, such as the Oceanic Shoals.

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Environment Australia is tasked with managing the networks of Commonwealth Marine Reserves.  This is particularly challenging in the remote and poorly known N and NW regions. Researchers from Australia's NESP Marine Biodiversity Hub's D1 project highlight five key environmental variables that may help predict biodiversity patterns across these regions.
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In partnership with the Western Australian Department of Parks and Wildlife, Western Australian Marine Science Institution scientists on the Australian Institute of Marine Science vessel RV Solander recently spent 15 days in the field collecting data to help determine what flatback sea turtles in north-western Australia eat.
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Flatback sea turtles (Natator depressus) are endemic to northern Australia and one of only two sea turtle species that are not distributed globally (7 species in total). Nesting occurs only on tropical Australian beaches, many in NW Australia’s remote Kimberley region. Under threat from coastal development, predation from feral animals and climate change, flatbacks are listed as a vulnerable species under the WA Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 and the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and data deficient by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

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See what's happening during biodiversity month in Australia's unique north west marine region.
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The Land and Sea Management Strategy for Torres Strait (2016-2036) (‘the Strategy’) is a guiding framework for enabling Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal people to continue to sustainably manage and benefit from their land, sea and cultural resources into the future.
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To-date, little attention has been paid to the social values associated with marine parks. However, understanding peoples’ needs and values is essential for effective marine park planning and management.
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Scientists from the Australian Institute of Marine Science, CSIRO and the WA Museum continue their exploration of the tropical waters of north-west Australia’s remote Kimberley region.
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The ocean's colour is a reflection of its composition. Researchers, currently at sea, are measuring Kimberley seawater to see how accurately remote measurements (e.g. satellite imagery) reflect ocean composition.
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In a remote marine environment, dominated by gushing tides and swirling waters, diverse and unique marine communities have remained hidden until now…
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Coral reefs in north west Australia provide the perfect opportunity to study the effects of warming events in a region not heavily impacted by humans.
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Marine scientists are supercharging marine research using remote sensing technologies and increased computing power to reveal secrets from one of the most remote and pristine marine regions in Australia.
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Dr Radford explains how he uses sound to explore and map deeper 'hidden' coral reefs of the Timor Sea. It is only recently that these reefs have started to be documented. Many remain undiscovered.
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In 2013 and 2014 AIMS undertook a biodiversity survey of coral and fish species on the reefs around 5 islands in Torres Strait. This article shows the coral photo collection that was taken for species identification.
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Research into Australia's north west oceanic shoals have found them to support exceptional species diversity with fish richness greater than that found on similar submerged reefs on the Great Barrier Reef.
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As part of the NERP TE project 2.3 temperature loggers were deployed at 15 sites across the Torres Strait to measure ocean temperature. The loggers regularly (every 10 minutes) measure the sea water temperature and record it in their memory. Every year or so the loggers are swapped with new loggers and the recorded data is extracted and recorded in the AIMS Real Time Data Systems database as part of the Australia wide Sea Temperature Observing System.

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