Recent datasets

Published on 26 November 2015

The database contains native and alien species records for National Park islands in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Attributes for each record include information on abundance, life history traits, habitat requirements, limitations of source, and relevant species information from government bodies including EPBC and NCA listings. Basic interaction information among species (alien vs. native) is also recorded. This dataset also has basic information about the islands such as area, location, and regional ecosystem types present on the island.

Published on 24 November 2015

This project will develop a cost-effective approach for prioritising management actions across Great Barrier Reef islands to maximise conservation outcomes. The approach will be broad-based and include pest control, adjustment of fire regimes, biosecurity measures and monitoring. A decision-support tool with GIS capability will help managers to identify management priorities within and between islands.The sub-region selected for this project includes 150 islands within the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area from south of Mackay to Bundaberg.

Published on 7 October 2015

This data collection was started in 2005 as part of the Reef Plan. \n \nNearshore water quality data from direct water sampling by Niskin cast (suspended solids; chlorophyll; nitrogen, phosphorus and organic carbon species; silicate), summarised for the whole Great Barrier Reef and for each Natural Resource Management (NRM) region, by year (2005/06, 2006/07, etc.) and season (dry season, May-Oct; and wet season, Nov-Apr). Salinity, secchi depth, and temprature. \n \nFrom October 2007 data loggers are deployed at 14 sites to record readings of chlorophyll a and turbidity every 10 minutes.

Published on 28 September 2015

This dataset is a photo mosaic of historic aerial imagery of the southern Atherton Tablelands from 16th June 1978.

It includes the towns of Atherton, Malanda, Yungaburra and Tolga. It has a southern boundary just north of Millaa Millaa, a northern boundary of Lake Tinaroo, an eastern boundary of a quarter of Wooroonooran National Park and a western boundary of Atherton.

Published on 17 September 2015

This dataset shows the measured response of the photosystems of seagrasses to herbicides in experiments conducted in 2012-2013. The data is provided as a multi-sheet spreadsheet.

Published on 17 September 2015

The objective of this project is to assess how management of local stressors such as land runoff can help improve the resilience of coral reefs to global stressors (climate change) which are more difficult to manage. Complementary laboratory and field experiments will investigate the combined impacts of declining water quality (increased nutrients and sediments, and reduced light and salinity), increased sea temperature and ocean acidification on key reef species groups such as corals, foraminifera, crown-of-thorns starfish and rock-boring sea urchins.

Published on 17 September 2015

Sediment samples for foraminiferan community analysis were collected from 20 reefs located between 13.5°S and 20.5°S within the Great Barrier Reef. Most of these reefs are inshore fringing reefs which can be grouped into three distinct geographical regions: eight reefs of the Whitsunday area (collected in August 2004), four reefs from Princess Charlotte Bay, and four from the Wet Tropic area (both collected in October 2004). Sediments were also collected from two midshelf reefs (Charity and Bait Reefs) in August 2004, and two outer shelf reefs (Hastings and Flynn Reefs) in January 2005.

Published on 1 July 2015

This project investigates in detail the exposure and sensitivity of Wet Tropics animals to extreme climate and weather events, such as heat waves, fires, flooding rain and cyclones. This information will be used to assess and map the vulnerability of biodiversity to the impacts of current and future extreme events in the Wet Tropics bioregion. The information gathered in the Wet Tropics can potentially be applied to other regions in Australia and elsewhere to predict and mitigate the impacts of extreme climatic events on biodiversity.

Published on 1 July 2015

The project seeks to improve understanding of practices that can underpin co-management arrangements for conservation areas, including the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (WTWHA).

A co-research team of CSIRO scientists, Rainforest Aboriginal peoples, protected area managers and other key partners will investigate the potential of Indigenous Protected Areas (IPAs), and other collaborative models and tools, to engage Indigenous values and world views. The team will focus on the conditions under which these arrangements lead to effective joint management.

Published on 1 July 2015

To support management of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, coral reef managers need decision support tools that can integrate physical and biological information at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. In this project we will construct vulnerability maps for the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) This project will deliver a novel framework for linking impacts of environmental change to spatial patterns of coral reef resilience and vulnerability.

Published on 1 July 2015

This very large study is part of the Seabed biodiversity study, published in Pitcher et al. (2007). Its purpose was to quantify patterns in seabed biodiversity and inter-reefal environmental conditions throughout the GBR.

Published on 1 July 2015

This project will develop a Management Strategy Evaluation (MSE) framework to build understanding of the key human uses and drivers of change in the inshore Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and to inform GBR stakeholders of the likely consequences, costs and benefits of particular management decisions that aim to minimise the impacts on biodiversity, particularly from inshore multi-species fisheries.

Published on 1 July 2015

Climate change has emerged as the single greatest threat to coral reefs. The climate change threat will take many forms and includes projections that there will be higher abundances of coral diseases. Links have already been made between high temperatures and outbreaks of the disease ‘white syndrome’ in the Indo-Pacific but little is known about the disease due, in part, to not knowing where outbreaks will occur.

Published on 1 July 2015

The purpose of this study is to detect and quantify spatial and temporal changes in reef fish assemblages of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Between 1993 and 2005, reef fish assemblages of 46 reefs were monitored annually along permanent transects within a standard habitat using visual census. The selected intensive survey reefs are distributed across three positions of the continental shelf and among six sectors each representing one band of latitude. These reefs continue to be surveyed in odd years as part of the Long Term Monitoring Program (LTMP).

Published on 1 July 2015

This project focuses on relationships between socio-economic systems and the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). It comprises three interrelated activities to investigate:

1. Resident and tourist views about the relative ‘value’ of key ecosystem services that are provided by the reef. Researchers will design, distribute and analyse the results of a survey instrument to assess the relative value of different goods and services produced by the GBR to stakeholder groups using both traditional money-based valuation techniques and Larson’s non-monetary based technique.

Published on 1 July 2015

This record details the TUMRAs that were in effect in 2009. Since then the number of TUMRAs has significantly increases. For the latest agreements refer to GBRMPA.

Traditional use activities in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park are managed under the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Act 1975, and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Regulations 1983. The Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Zoning Plan 2003 recognises that under section 211 of the Native Title Act 1993, native title holders may undertake traditional use of marine resources in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park.

Published on 1 July 2015

This dataset consists reprocessing and reformatting the SRTM30 PLUS v8.0 Digital Elevation Model (DEM) dataset developed by Scripps Institute Of Oceanography, University of California San Diego (UCSD) to produce a single raster covering the globe in GeoTiff format and create a full and low resolution hillshading from this DEM. The aim of this derived dataset is to reformat the data to allow easy use with GIS applications.

Full resolution hillshading:

Published on 1 July 2015

This dataset consist of inputs and intermediate results from the coastal scenario modelling. It is an analysis of the bio-physical factors that best explain the changes in QLUMP land use change between 1999 and 2009 along the Queensland coastal region for the classifications used in the future coastal modelling.

Methods:

The input layers (variables etc) were produced using a range of sources as shown in Table 1. Source datasets were edited to produce raster dataset at 50m resolution and reclassified to suit the needs for the analysis.

Published on 1 July 2015

This dataset consists of rasters representing downscaled climate change scenarios (8 km resolution) for the Torres Strait and Papua New Guinea regions for 1990, 2055, 2090. This includes estimated mean surface relative humidity (%), wind speed, rainfall rate (mm per day) and surface temperature (degrees Celsius) estimated from simulated conditions for 1980?1999, 2046-2065 and 2080?2099 time periods. Also included is the relative change of each attribute with respect to 1990.

Published on 1 July 2015

This dataset contains responses from line (n=53), charter (n=40), and trawl (n=21) fishers to a face-to-face survey about the impacts of the 2004 rezoning of the GBR on commercial fishing activity and commercial fishers.

Data Units:

Quantitative data about fishers attitudes, perceptions, and opinions about the 2004 zoning plan plus spatial data regarding pre- and post-rezoning locations used by fishers.

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