Recent datasets

Published on 12 February 2018

This data set shows the occupancy and size of spectacled flying-fox camps across the distribution of the spectacled flying-fox in the Wet Tropics Region. Camp locations are also provided. Data was collected monthly and all camps in the region were monitored each month.

Published on 18 December 2017

The purpose of this data set was to compile distributional, general life-history characteristics and phylogenies for Australian tropical rain forest vertebrates to inform a wide range of comparative studies on the determinants of biodiversity patterns and to assess the impacts of global climate change.

Published on 18 December 2017

This dataset contains Landsat 5 imagery for selected areas of Queensland, currently Torres Strait and around Lizard Island and Cape Tribulation.

This collection was made as a result of the development of the Torres Strait Features dataset. It includes a number (typically 4 - 8) of selected Landsat images for each scene from the entire Landsat 5 archive. These images were selected for having low cloud cover and clear water. The aim of this collection was to allow investigation of the marine features.

Published on 18 December 2017

This project seeks to ensure that planning for the future development of the Torres Strait Islands is sustainable and capable of taking into account ecological and social information, assets, risk and existing infrastructure.

Published on 18 December 2017

This dataset shows (1) a raster spatial model of the distribution and relative density of dugongs (Dugong dugong) in the Torres Strait region based on an aggregate of 27 years (1987 - 2013) of systematic aerial surveys; and (2) a raster spatial model of the distribution and relative density of marine turtles (green turtles, Chelonia mydas) in the Torres Strait based on an aerial survey conducted in 2013.

Published on 18 December 2017

This dataset shows a raster spatial model of the distribution and relative density of dugongs (Dugong dugong) in the Torres Strait region based on an aggregate of 24 years (1987 - 2011) of systematic aerial surveys.

Published on 18 December 2017

This dataset shows a spatial model of the distribution and relative density of dugongs (Dugong dugong) in the Torres Strait region based on an aggregate of 19 years (1986, 1987, 1992, 1994, 1999, and 2005) of systematic aerial surveys. For more information on the methods used in the creation of this dataset see Grech. A., and Marsh. H. (2007) - Prioritising areas for dugong conservation in a marine protected area using a spatially explicit population model, Applied GIS, 3(2), 1-14.

Published on 28 November 2017

This collection is a record of MODIS satellite imagery before, during and after severe cyclone Yasi in February 2011. This image series highlights the damage the cyclone makes to the rainforest areas around mission beach and the turbulence created off shore by the cyclone on the 5th February (2.5 days after the cyclone). It corresponds to the images and maps from the "Cyclone Yasi satellite image maps - before and after" article in the eAtlas. Use this dataset if you wish to recreate these maps.

Published on 16 November 2017

About 50 selected reefs throughout the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are sampled in the AIMS Long-term Monitoring Project (LTMP). A visual census of fish on fixed transects (3 sites per reef, 5 x 50 m transects per site). Fishes from a list of 191 species, representing 10 families, are counted. \n \nIndividuals, Genus, Species are counted for a prescribed list of 212 species: all the parrotfishes, damselfishes, surgeon fishes, butterflyfishes, and some others. A full list of species observed each year are included in the appendices of each AIMS status report.

Published on 6 November 2017

This dataset shows the concentrations of the herbicide glyphosate remaining over time in a simulation flask persistence experiment conducted in 2013.

Glyphosate degradation experiments were carried out in flasks according to the OECD methods for ‘‘simulation tests’’. The tests used natural coastal seawater and were carried out in the incubator shakers under 3 conditions: (1) 25°C in the dark, (2) 31°C in the dark and (3) 25°C in the light. The light levels were ~40 µE on a 12:12 light:dark cycle and the flasks shaken at 100 rpm for up to 330 days.

Published on 6 November 2017

This very large study is published in Pitcher et al. (2007). Its purpose was to quantify patterns in seabed biodiversity and inter-reefal environmental conditions throughout the GBR.

Published on 11 September 2017

Towed Video surveys down to a depth of ~50 m was completed successfully all at the following 9 banks and shoals (Baracuda East and West Shoals, Sheldon Shoal, Wave Governor Bank, Heywood Shoal, Echuca Shoal, Goeree Shoal, Eugene McDermott Shoal, Vulcan Shoal). Sampling involved habitat classification conducted in real-time during the surveys, and taking photographic still image at 10 s intervals for subsequent analysis as the cameras were towed across the shoals at a speed of 1-2 knots.

Published on 11 September 2017

Towed Video surveys down to a depth of ~50 m was completed successfully at the following shoals (Baracuda East, Goeree Shoal, Vulcan Shoal).

Published on 11 September 2017

Towed Video surveys down to a depth of ~50 m was completed successfully at the following shoals (Baracuda East, Goeree Shoal, Vulcan Shoal).

Published on 5 September 2017

A total of 365 towed video transects were completed in the 2006/2007 surveys. The sampling has identified a vast array of habitats and will be used for broad scale mapping of benthic communities in the marine park, however further transect tows will be conducted in 2008 in areas of special interest, where sampling is considered limited and where ground-truthing is required. Towed video sampling effort was concentrated around Mandu, Osprey, Yardie, Winderabandi and Point Cloates in 2006.

Published on 31 August 2017

Stereo Baited Remote Underwater Video Stations (BRUVS) were successfully deployed and retrieved at each of the 3 shoals (Baracuda East , Goeree Shoal, Vulcan Shoal). Deployments were restricted to <50 m depth and each unit was separated from its nearest neighbour by >250 m. In general 24 stereo BRUVS were deployed at each shoal.\n This project is a co-investment between PTTEPAA and AIMS, in order to build scientific knowledge on a number of shoal features in the area near Montara and was undertaken between 19/9/16 - 24/9/16.\n

Published on 29 June 2017

Stereo Baited Remote Underwater Video Stations (BRUVS) were deployed and retrieved across two shoals of regional interest, Evans and Tassie Shoals, two of the closest shoals to the Barossa field. The allocation of deployment positions across each shoal was conducted using a regular/random design within the bounds of the 60 m depth contour whilst maintaining a minimum distance of 250 m between each stereo-BRUVS unit. Once the positions were derived, the sequence of deployments, in sets of eight replicate units, was determined by proximity and prevailing sea conditions on the day.

Published on 29 June 2017

Towed video surveys were carried out in targeted shallow seabed environments within the proposed Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) in the Timor Sea. The survey concentrated on shelf habitats (< 200m) of the western part of the Oceanic Shoals CMR and included potential biodiversity hotspots such as pinnacles, banks and shoals. In total, 52 towed video transects were collected at depths of between 31 and 129 metres.

Published on 28 June 2017

Towed video surveys were carried out across five principle locations of regional interest, including Evans, Tassie and Blackwood Shoals, the closest shoals to the Barossa field, as well as two mid-shelf seabed locations adjacent to Goodrich Bank and Cape Helvetius. In total, 113 towed video transects and 2246 downward facing digital still images were collected at depths of between 11 and 100 metres.

Published on 27 June 2017

Towed video surveys between were carried out in targeted shallow seabed environments within and adjacent to the proposed Oceanic Shoals Commonwealth Marine Reserve (CMR) in the Timor Sea. The survey concentrated on shelf habitats (< 200m) of the Oceanic Shoals CMR and included potential biodiversity hotspots such as pinnacles, banks and shoals. In total, 48 towed video transects were collected at depths of between 17.2 and 89 metres.

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